IoT networks – LoRaWAN, UWB and 5G.

The Internet of Things (IoT) allows the physical world to be digitally monitored or even controlled and businesses can leverage the benefits of IoT solutions to not only optimise their processes, but also to work more sustainably and at the cutting edge. Sensors, cameras and (edge) gateways form the basis, generating data and saving them in the cloud or on specific servers over suitable networks before being converted into discernible information by certain applications. Analyses allow users to evaluate what they have in front of them and offer greater transparency as well as the ability to react more quickly and a differentiation tends to be made between monitoring, alerts and predictive analyses.

With this in mind, it is essential to know how and using which network protocol IoT data are transferred as there are a variety of networks and methods that come into play. Deciding which solution is the best depends on how it is going to be used, the volume of data to be transferred, how long a sensor’s battery should last and the distance over which the data are to be transmitted. Security is also an aspect that needs to be considered from the very start. Our experts can advise you on the best IoT solutions for your needs and can even configure a customised, future-proof network to take you to the cutting edge.

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IoT networks made by Bechtle – Your benefits:

In-depth expertise in networks and IoT for your projects – Consultation, installation, operation and documentation.

The right network for your needs – Our experts offer objective, vendor-neutral advice on all available options.

We’ll tailor a solution based on use, data volumes and distance.

Have questions about IoT/OT security? We have the answers.

Patrick Hardes

An IoT network is the basis of every IoT application. Without a reliable data stream, even the best platforms won’t work properly, but there are individual requirements to consider such as the volume of data to be transmitted, the distance they need to be transferred, the precision with which something has to be localised, and whether or not sensors are mains or battery powered. Our experts know all there is to know about networks—from LAN and WLAN to LoRa and UWB and everything in between—you’ll benefit from our extensive experience.

Patrick Hardes, IoT network expert

 

Choosing the right network with Bechtle.

Benefit from our many years of experience in all things, network, internet,de vices and IoT security. No matter if 5G, WLAN, LAN, RFID, NFC technology, BLE, UWB or LoRaWAN, we’ll help you find the network technology that works best for you. Our services range from planning and coverage surveys to installation. Integration, operations and monitoring.

Illumination:

We’ll assess the network to ensure you always have the best signal.

Rollout:

During roll out and integration, we’ll configure your network in such a way to ensure it is flexible and you can easily integrate new sensors and other devices whenever you need to.

Operation:

Once everything is up and running, we monitor your IoT devices to ensure that the sensors and infrastructure are working smoothly and if something should go wrong, we’ll get on with rectifying the issue straight away.

Have questions about IoT/OT security? We have the answers.

Networks at a glance.

Click on each of the network names below to find out more about their attributes and where they really come into their own.

LAN and WLAN – Two well-known networks.
LPWAN (low-power WAN) – Low power, high range and minimum infrastructure costs.
UWB – Ultrawide band.
BLE (Bluetooth Low Energy).
5G networks – High data volumes + Speed.
NB-IoT and LTE-M – Leverage existing networks to transfer data.
LAN and WLAN – Two well-known networks.

Two of the most well known names are Local Area Network (LAN) and Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN). They both have the advantage that they can transmit large volumes of data due to their large bandwidth, something which is now also possible over 5G networks. This attribute makes LAN, WLAN and 5G perfect for transmitting camera recordings, sounds and control commands for machinery and self-driving vehicles requiring relatively large volumes of data and low latencies. However, these benefits are counterbalanced by the high infrastructure costs as the more the more data there are, the more expensive it becomes. Furthermore, data can only be transmitted via LAN and WLAN over short distances. For these reasons, other kinds of networks that allow new IoT use cases, are growing in importance. Read on to find out more.

LPWAN (low-power WAN) – Low power, high range and minimum infrastructure costs.

LoRa (long range), NB-IoT and Mioty are all LPWAN networks with excellent building coverage and low energy requirements making it possible to transmit data between sensors and objects up to 15 kilometres apart, albeit with a low data throughput. The benefits are low power consumption and a long range, plus the technology can connect a large number of sensors with a battery life of up to 15 years per device. In the real world, that means LPWAN technology is ideal for multiple use cases and requires little infrastructure. This in turn makes it easy to upgrade. Another benefit is the sensors’ long life means there is less need for maintenance. This technology is, therefore, used in smart metering to record real-time water and power consumption. LoRa is used in multiple application areas including smart cities, asset tracking, retail, logistics, agriculture, smart buildings and smart factories.

UWB – Ultrawide band.

Ultra wideband is a radio-based communications technology used for short-range, fast and stable data transfers. Best of all, UWB allows the precise location and movement of objects in a room to be tracked down to 15 centimetres. In terms of IoT, UWB is perfect for use on production lines and in logistics as it reduces the time needed to search for people and goods, optimising paperless logistics and production processes. In the future, UWB will be increasingly rolled in public building and shops to allow micronavigation with a smartphone acting as a navigation tool. Today’s smartphones already have UWB chips built in and the infrastructures necessary are increasingly being installed.

BLE (Bluetooth Low Energy).

BLE is a wireless technology that allows devices within a ten-metre radius to be connected. Compared to regular Bluetooth, BLE is characterised by considerably lower energy consumption and thus lower costs. When it comes to IoT, energy-saving transmission technology plays an important role. BLE technology is predominantly used in buildings where assets are equipped with a sensor that transmits data on location and status.

5G networks – High data volumes + Speed.

5G has established itself as the newest standard in mobile communications, but other areas and businesses are also benefiting from its fast transmission speeds as automating production processes and technologies such as virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) become increasingly important. What’s more, 5G is used in logistics for self-driving vehicles as well as for camera-based systems creating the basis for fast, high-volume data transfers with very low latencies that are perfect for a variety of data-heavy applications.

NB-IoT and LTE-M – Leverage existing networks to transfer data.

When it come to energy efficiency, coverage within buildings, battery life and costs, low-power wide-area networks are often the first port of call for IoT applications. When goods are being transported, by land, air or sea, you need good network coverage to track where they are, which is where the standardised and licensed mobile communications technology narrowband IoT comes into play. NB-IoT/LTE-M are characterised by outstanding ranges and long battery lives and are, therefore, ideal for applications with low levels of data traffic (e.g. track and trace sensors).

LAN and WLAN – Two well-known networks.

Two of the most well known names are Local Area Network (LAN) and Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN). They both have the advantage that they can transmit large volumes of data due to their large bandwidth, something which is now also possible over 5G networks. This attribute makes LAN, WLAN and 5G perfect for transmitting camera recordings, sounds and control commands for machinery and self-driving vehicles requiring relatively large volumes of data and low latencies. However, these benefits are counterbalanced by the costs of LAN and WLAN as the more the more data there are, the more expensive it becomes. Furthermore, data can only be transmitted via LAN and WLAN over short distances. For these reasons, other kinds of networks that allow new IoT use cases, are growing in importance. Read on to find out more.

Long-range (LoRa) – Low consumption, extended reach.

LoRa (long-range) is an IoT network with good building coverage and low energy requirements making it possible to transmit data between sensors and objects 15 to 20 kilometres apart, albeit with a low data throughput. The benefits are low power consumption and a long range, and the tech can connect several million nodes such as sensors and has a battery life of over ten years per device. In the real world, that means LoRa technology is ideal for multiple use cases and requires little infrastructure. Another benefit is the sensors’ long life means there is less need for maintenance. This technology is, therefore, used in smart metering to record real-time water and power consumption. LoRa is used in multiple application areas including smart cities, asset tracking, retail, logistics, agriculture, smart buildings and smart factories.

UWB – Ultrawide band.

Ultrawide band is a radio-based communications technology ideal for the fast and stable transmission of data over a short range. What’s more UWB also allows precise locating that allows the location and movement of objects in a room to be tracked. In IoT, UWB is used for use in production and logistics as well as for trade fairs as well as for indoor micronavigation through UWB chips, which are installed in most smartphones these days. UWB is the perfect choice when it comes to precisely tracking objects and people.

BLE (Bluetooth Low Energy).

BLE is a wireless technology that allows devices within a ten-metre radius to be connected. Compared to regular Bluetooth, BLE is characterised by considerably lower energy consumption and thus lower costs. When it comes to IoT, energy-saving transmission technology plays an important role. Most machines, devices and sensors are already equipped with a Bluetooth interface so BLE can be used to connect a host of devices to the internet and enable the secure transmission of data.

5G networks – High data volumes + Speed.

5G has established itself as the newest standard in mobile communications, but other areas and businesses are also benefiting from its fast transmission speeds as automating production processes and technologies such as virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) become increasingly important. 5G is creating the basis for fast, high-volume data transfers with low latencies over a short distance that are perfect for modern applications. These low latencies enable real-time interactions.

NB-IoT and LTE-M – The future of IoT connectivity.

When it come to energy efficiency, coverage within buildings, battery life and costs, low-power wide-area networks are the first port of call for IoT applications. There are two standardised mobile communications technologies that play a central role—narrowband IoT and LTE for machine-machine communication (LTE-M).

NB-IoT enables extended ranges and long battery lives making it perfect for stationary applications with low levels of data traffic. On the other hand, LTE-M is ideal for high data rates and mobility support and thus for IoT application with high transfer speeds.

Domicil implements IoT for digitalisation.

Domicil is number one in long-term care in the canton of Bern, Switzerland. Thanks to an IoT solution by Bechtle, the company was able to automate the documentation of medicine inventorying. 

LEARN MORE

Domicil implements IoT for digitalisation.

Domicil is number one in long-term care in the canton of Bern, Switzerland. Thanks to an IoT solution by Bechtle, the company was able to automate the documentation of medicine inventorying. 

LEARN MORE

IoT all-in solution – All from a single source.

We offer a customised all-in-one IoT solution—from consulting and design to IoT networks, out-of-the-box platforms, cloud, applications, ERP connections, IoT services and IoT security—making us your go-to platform. You receive everything from a single source and have one single contact supporting you every step of the way as you require.

More from our IoT portfolio:

Bechtle IoT Solutions.

Our extensive specialised knowledge, many years of IT and IoT experience plus a strong partner network make us your perfect partner when it comes to planning and implementation.

IoT platforms for a range of applications.

We have the perfect platform, for your use case, offer extensive advice and help you when it comes to integration and operations.

IoT services – All from a single source. All from Bechtle.

Benefit from our IoT experts’ experience and knowledge transfer within our well-connected IoT community.

IoT security – Secure your corporate network.

We consider all internet, cloud, edge and OT security aspects from day one to make your IoT project perfectly secure and scalable.